What’s next on your Agile journey?

What’s next on your Agile journey?

Hello Agile Adventurer:

My son Zach and I hiking in Maine.

As an avid hiker, I tend to focus on the journey not so much the destination. The same is true with Agile. All of you are in a different place on your Agile journey. Some of you are well into your Agile implementation while others of you are still getting started. I would like to offer you some tips and tools for your journey:

Where are you today? Assess your Agile Maturity: I have a free Agile assessment to help you see where you are. It includes 60 yes/no type questions that are weighted to give you an overall maturity score. In an effort to continuously improve, you should try to perform self-assessments at least once per year: https://www.capeprojectmanagement.com/agile-self-assessment/

If you would like an assessment of your whole team or company, contact me about my group assessment and full-day retrospective: https://www.capeprojectmanagement.com/advanced-agile-review-and-assessment/

Tools to help you on your journey:

  1. Be prepared! Take a refresher training or get new team members up to speed quickly: All of my core Agile courses are available in self-study narrated slide-based courses with module tests: https://capeprojectmanagement.learnupon.com/store
  2. Learn and share your experiences: Read my Practical Agile Blog. Provide your own comments or insights. If you have an article you want to share, I would be happy to post in on my blog as well: https://www.capeprojectmanagement.com/blog/
  3. Refine your skills, get certified: Though I am a firm believer that certification alone is not a measure of skill, it does show a commitment to improvement. I provide practice exams and online training for all the “open source” certifications, e.g. those that don’t require a specific licensed course or franchisee trainer. https://www.capeprojectmanagement.com/agile-exams/ Also, if you didn’t know the PMI-ACP exam is changing again on March 26, so if you have been studying, make sure you take it soon!
  4. Lastly, on a separate note, some of you are using Agile to start a new business or you are starting all over. For the last couple of years, in addition to coaching organizations, I have been providing personal coaching. This, along with my website hosting services, have been been fulfilling work because I am able to help individuals achieve their dreams and aspirations. Let me know if you would like some help to reach your destination.

Again, treat Agile as a journey. There is so much to experience along the way and so many opportunities for success. Good luck in your achieving all of your goals in 2018!

Dan

@scrumdan

dan@capeprojectmanagement.com

 

 

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An Agile software development approach could have prevented this – just saying.

An Agile software development approach could have prevented this – just saying.

UPDATE: January 30, 2018 The Washington Post published an article with more details: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2018/01/30/heres-what-went-wrong-with-that-hawaii-missile-alert-the-fcc-says/?utm_term=.84e766af06c6 It is interesting that one of the suggestions I mentioned to prevent this was actually in place, "They then must click 'yes' when the system asks 'Are you sure that you want to send this Alert?'" the article also stated that the application uses “the same language irrespective of whether the message [is] a test or actual alert.” Hmmm.

I live most of the year in Hawaii on the island of Oahu and was woken by this alert last week. Needless to say it was a distressing event that should not have happened. I don’t claim to have any inside information other than what I have read in the paper, but I have managed enough software development projects to know the root cause of this kind of error. I have been contemplating writing about this for the last week, and first of all I want to say, “Do not fire the person that sent this out!” This was user error but based upon a poorly designed system that is all too common in software development projects. For those of you who aren’t in the industry, let me walk you through how this happens:

“Traditional” Approach to Project Management:

Step 1 Business Requirements: A business person or customer decides what they want an application to do and they create a high-level requirement. e,g. “Create an application to allow a user to send out an alert to the phone and television emergency systems. This application should have a dual purpose for both testing the system and for sending actual alerts.”

Step 2 Analysis and Design: Analysts then create a set of system requirements based the business requirement. A designer designs screens to support the application. An architect designs how each piece will work together. They write everything down and get sign-off from their business stakeholder. They then hand it to a software developer to build. Sounds good so far?

Step 3 Development: (This is where it really break down) The developer builds it exactly the way it was written down!

Step 4 Testing: (Final failure point.) The developer hands-off the application to the tester, who tests it to make sure it meets the original business requirement and technical specifications. Once it passes the tests, it is ready to go live.

Again, for those of you who are not in this industry, the above steps probably seem completely reasonable, and many projects are still run this way. The problem is, this approach is why 50% of projects fail. I worked under this model for about 10 years until I experienced a couple of major project failures. Those project failures probably cost more than the above mentioned failure because they were expensive commercial software development projects that built a product “exactly the way it was written down.”

After those experiences, I became an Agile evangelist. For the last 10+ years I have focused on managing, consulting and training on Agile practices. We still have failures but there are far fewer, and if we fail, we fail fast. Also, Agile software development is a true collaboration between the users and the developers. So, for those of you who do not know much about Agile, let me tell you how we (the Agile community) would manage this project:

Agile Approach to Project Management: 

Step 1 Business Requirements: This step is pretty much the same - a business person creates a high-level requirement. e,g. “Create an application to allow the user to send out an alert to the phone and television emergency systems. This application should have a dual purpose both for testing the system and for actual alerts.” We call this big requirement an Epic.

Step 2 Analysis and Design – Agile Discovery: (This is where everything changes) There is no analyst or middle-man between the developer and the business. Here is what we do:

  • The business person is part of the project and joins the development team.
  • At the start of the project we then have a workshop to break that big requirement into smaller requirements called user stories.
  • Included in the workshop are the people who will be developing and testing the software, business people, potential users and any interested stakeholders.
  • There is a facilitated session where we review the high level requirements and ask the following questions*:

What will the user likely do next?

What mistakes could they make?

What could confuse them?

What additional information might they need?

*Let me be clear, I did not come up with these questions in response that alert failure. It may look like I am using hindsight to fix the problem since asking those questions and addressing them would have obviously prevented the alert from being sent out. The reality is, I took those questions directly from an Agile training I have been delivering for years. I learned that technique from a leading Agile author, Mike Cohn, in his book User Stories Applied: For Agile Software DevelopmentThis is a common technique in Agile to ensure an application is well thought through.

  • The final difference in this step is that in that requirements meeting the developers are listening, asking questions, and writing notes that make up the specification. There is no second hand information, they design and build the application based upon their conversation with their customer.

Step 3 Agile Development: A key difference in Agile is that requirements are presented as a problem to solve not a specification to be built. It is the developers’ job to come up with a solution. The developers understand the business need since they reviewed the requirements with their customer. They are empowered to ask questions and clarify the design while they build it. They have a business owner or customer representative on the team who is available daily to answer questions. They are asking questions in real time, such as, “It seems like the requirement to test the system and execute a real alert are very different activities and should have a very different workflow and authentication model? Technically, there are many ways we can prevent errors from happening. Can I show you a couple of options?” Again, I am not using hindsight. I worked with systems that had a single critical field that if filled in incorrectly required a lot of work to fix. In those cases developers know the technical, and often simple, best practices to ensure quality of data entry. You may have seen these before even on a regular webpage:

  • Please enter your password again (replace the word password with “authorization for an alert”)
  • Please type YES if you want to close this screen without saving (replace the words without saving to “send the alert”)
  • A more advanced technique I have used in the past is called Double Key Data Entry.This a common technique for ensuring quality of high-risk data entry. Two different people have to enter the same information before the workflow can progress. I used it on a project for entering SSNs since an incorrectly typed SSN caused a new customer to be created instead of updating an existing customer. This prevented a lot of rework. Seems like this would be a great approach for this situation.

Step 4 Agile Testing: Testing is done very differently as well. We test as soon as we build a single functioning piece of software. We don’t wait until we build the entire application. That prevents the high cost of fixing errors. Also, another difference, and probably more critical in this situation, is we write all of our test cases, called acceptance criteria, before we develop anything. That ensures that the developer knows how the product is going to be tested and then used in the real world.

Again, don’t blame the end-user. This happens all the time our industry it’s just that the failures aren’t so public. This is why implementing Agile has become mission critical for many organizations. Implementing Agile to prevent these problems rather than assigning blame is the real lesson learned from this experience.

About the Author, Dan Tousignant

Dan is the president of Cape Project Management, Inc. and is a lifelong project manager. He has embraced Agile as the most effective way to manage software development projects. He has been managing mission critical projects and developing training for over twenty-years and is passionate about improving project team performance.

https://www.capeprojectmanagement.com/

Dan@CapeProjectManagement.com

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The Practical Agile Blog

The Practical Agile Blog

The Practical Agile Blog

Finding ways to be Agile in an un-Agile world.

Are you ready for Agile?

Has your Agency or organization started moving to Agile? Do you hear the word Scrum, and wonder where the Rugby game is at?
Well, you may be part of the growing trend in IT organizations throughout the Federal Government.

read more

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Agile 2.0 – It’s about People and Connections! It’s not about Scaling.

Agile 2.0 – It’s about People and Connections! It’s not about Scaling.

Andrew Carnegie once said,

Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.

His observation is spot on, and yet, when discussing Agile Software Development, we find ourselves focused on frameworks instead of people and connections.

Over the past 15 years, Dan Tousignant and Todd Kamens, two Agile thought leaders, have collaborated on numerous projects.  Leveraging Traditional Project Management, Scrum, Lean and Kanban techniques to manage software projects they have now joined to share their thoughts.

Working together on and off over the years, Dan and Todd have discussed many issues with clients’ different implementations of Agile, and with each conversation, a pattern started to emerge.  It wasn’t clear at first, but they started to see how Agile’s success was more about the people and values than the prescribed process and framework.  Dan and Todd started to see how Agile was becoming a practice that was unique to each company and involved people and connections in making it succeed.

Interestingly, when Dan and Todd saw these connections in the workplace, they had both started to practice Mindfulness.  Mindfulness seems to be the new buzzword these days for the stressed out corporate executive, those going through a midlife crisis or those that are just searching for more meaning out of their day.  Though it is a new term, it is not a new concept and has existed for thousands of years.

We are not attempting to teach Mindfulness in this article, however, it is important to understand it at it’s core as defined by Jon Kabat-Zin as follows,

Mindfulness is paying attention, on purpose, in the present, and non-judgmentally, to the unfolding of the experience moment by moment.

In their conversations about Agile and Mindfulness, the patterns became clear as they started to see how Mindfulness aligned with the core values of Agile.  

AgileMindfulness
Individuals and Interactions over processes and toolsMindfulness teaches us to be open to novelty, sensitive to different contexts and to be aware of multiple perspectives.
Working software over comprehensive documentationMindfulness teaches us to accept change, to appreciate other viewpoints and to be able to focus on the present.
Customer collaboration over contract negotiationMindfulness teaches us an awareness of multiple perspectives and listening to hear versus listening to reply.
Responding to change over following a planMindfulness teaches us to cherish trust, expertise and direct communication.

In summary, Agile 2.0 moves us beyond Frameworks and instead, focuses on people and connections.  We observe how the individual, the team and the organization work together to achieve amazing results.  We pay attention to one another, non-judgmentally, and work together to achieve great value for our customers.

Over the course of several collaborative articles, Dan and Todd will convey their vision of Agile 2.0 and explain how leveraging Mindfulness practices with your Agile software development adoption can create better people, teams and companies capable of achieving greatness.

 

Dan Tousignant, President, Cape Project Management, Inc.

Todd Kamens, President, Guidance Technology, Inc.

 

BE AGILE.®

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Certifications, Integrity, Values: Where do you stand?

Certifications, Integrity, Values: Where do you stand?

Last week I passed the Product Owner Assessment (PSPO 1) from Scrum.org (you can check out my new PSPO 1 mock exam here).  As an Agile Coach and Trainer, I try to stay current with certifications. I don’t believe that these certifications necessarily make someone more effective, but for me, they are a structured way of staying current with industry best practices. As part of my long-term professional development plan, I have been thinking , “What’s next?” I had already achieved what I considered to be the core certifications for a project management consultant; PMP, PMI-ACP, PSM 1, PSPO 1, CSPO, CSP, so I wasn’t sure in which direction should I go? Should I go “big”, like SaFE or DAD (heaven forbid). Should I get certified as an Agile or PMI Trainer and pay thousands in licensing and application fees? As an independent consultant, these types of certifications become cost prohibitive.

The value provided by consultants like me is that we offer services based upon real world experience at a reasonable cost. Not that long ago, I sat in a meeting with an external project management auditor from one of the Big Four. His rate was $475/hour. He was hired to audit my Scrum project to see if it was adhering to project management best practices. He started his initial findings meeting with, “I was reading about this Agile thing last night, and I think I have some recommendations.” Once my blood pressure dropped to reasonable levels, I realized that this interaction only reiterated that I needed to stay committed to my values:

  • Always provide value to my customer.
  • Stay current on best practices.
  • Keep my expenses low so I can offer reasonable rates.
  • Never sacrifice integrity for profitability.

I considered these same values when reviewing the available certifications. Can I meet those values with my current certifications? At this point, my answer is yes. What about you?

If you are interested, at my last count, there are 64 different Agile certifications! (I am sure I missed some). Can you imagine the signature line on my emails?

Agile Certification Institute

  • Accredited Agile Practitioner (AAP)
  • Accredited Scrum Master (ASM)
  • Accredited Product Owner (APO)
  • Accredited Scaled Agile Practitioner (ASAP)
  • Accredited Kanban Practitioner (AKP)
  • Accredited Lean Software Development Practitioner (ALSP)
  • Certified Agile Associate (CAA)
  • Certified Scrum Associate (CSA)

Scrum Alliance

  • Certified Scrum Coach (CSC)
  • Certified Scrum Trainer (CST)
  • Certified Scrum Developer (CSD)
  • Certified Scrum Master (CSM)
  • Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO)
  • Certified Scrum Professional (CSP)

Disciplined Agile Consortium

  • Disciplined Agilist-White Belt
  • Disciplined Agilist-Yellow Belt
  • Disciplined Agilist-Green Belt
  • Disciplined Agilist-Black Belt

DSDM Consortium

  • AgilePM certification
  • DSDM Atern Foundation Certificate
  • DSDM Advanced Practitioner Certificate
  • DSDM Foundation Certification
  • DSDM Consultant
  • DSDM Coach
  • DSDM Trainer
  • DSDM Advanced Practitioner

The International Consortium for Agile

  • ICAgile Certified Professional (ICP)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Business Value Analysis (ICP-BVA)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Portfolio Management (ICP-PFM)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Project Management (ICP-APM)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Adaptive Management (ICP-ADM)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Team Facilitation (ICP-ATF)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Coaching (ICP-ACC)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Programming (ICP-PRG)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Software Design (ICP-ASD)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Testing (ICP-TST)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Test Automation (ICP-ATA)
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Enterprise Agile Coaching
  • ICAgile Certified Professional in Agile Leadership

International Scrum Institute

  • Scrum Master Accredited Certification (SMAC)
  • Scrum Product Owner Accredited Certification (SPOAC)
  • Scrum Team Member Accredited Certification (STMAC)
  • Scrum Certification for Java Developer (SC4JD)
  • Scrum Certification for Web Developer (SC4WD)
  • Scrum Certification for Mobile App Developer (SC4MD)

The LeSS Company

  • Certified LeSS Practitioner
  • Certified LeSS for Executives

Project Management Institute

  • PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)

Scaled Agile Inc.

  • SAFe Agilist (SA)
  • SAFe Practitioner (SP)
  • SAFe Program Consultant (SPC)
  • SAFe Program Consultant Trainer (SPCT)
  • SAFe Product Manager/Product Owner (SPMPO)

Scrum.org

  • Professional Scrum Developer (PSD)
  • Professional Scrum Master I (PSM I)
  • Professional Scrum Master II (PSM II)
  • Professional Scrum Product Owner I(PSPO I)
  • Professional Scrum Product Owner II(PSPO II)
  • Scaled Professional Scrum (SPS)

SCRUMStudy.com

  • Scrum Master Certified (SMC)
  • Scrum Developer Certified (SDC)
  • Scrum Product Owner Certified SPOC)
  • Agile Expert Certified (AEC)
  • Scrum Fundamentals Certified (SFC)

People have different reasons for certification. Some do it to advance their careers, others to learn new skills. Yes, there are also those that use certifications to artificially represent their expertise. I don't worry about them because the job will weed out those people. Ultimately, you need to decide, based upon your professional values. Will these certifications allow me to provide more value to my employer or my customer? Once you have that answer, the decision is easy.

Dan Tousignant, PMP, CSP, PMI-ACP, etc., etc., etc.

President, Cape Project Management, Inc.

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